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Posts tagged “NCAA

College Football Pick ‘Em – Week 1

Hopefully I will be able to update these weekly. Instead of typing in every pick, I’ve learned how to use the handy dandy print screen feature on the computer. This will make life a lot easier for me. So…with that said, here we go.


Quick Shots

Chargers Release LT – His days as a productive no. 1 running back are over. As much as I would hate this move (I’m a Dolphin fan), he could take a pay cut and sign with the Patriots. They always seem to take aging backs and use them well. Look at Corey Dillon, Antowain Smith and now Kevin Faulk. They are not Pro-Bowl caliber, but New England knows how to maximize their players’ strengths while minimizing their weaknesses.

Jose Canseco still wants to fight this guy? Herschel still looks like he can win another Heisman

Eagles Release Westbrook – He served his purpose in Andy Reid’s pass-happy offense, but injuries are starting to mount. Plus, it is time for Philly to commit to running the ball between the tackles again to make things easier for whoever the team decides to keep as their quarterback.

Canseco still wants to fight Herschel – I simply do not think Jose gets it. He may be doing MMA as a celebrity stunt, but Herschel Walker is dead serious out being a legitimate fighter. That reason alone proves why Canseco should fear for his life if he were to get in the ring with Herschel.

Ole Miss looking for new mascot – …who cares? GTHOM!!! 41-27, 80-75, 71-63


UK/MSU – The Aftermath

I have reached that point as a MSU fan where losing close games we should win do not even bother me anymore. After last night’s game where I saw MSU lose a seven-point lead in a span of two minutes and melt in overtime, I stayed calm and content. After losses like that, I am usually sulking for about an hour. Officiating was horrible, and I was not yelling at the TV like I used to. I put the loss behind me before the game was officially over. What pissed me off more than anything was the action of a few fans in attendance. I understand the frustrations with the officials, but why would you embarrass your university…MY alma mater…on primetime national TV? Everything was set up perfectly to be a good night: record crowd, people actually wearing the shirts provided, the no. 2 team in the nation coming to town and an outstanding game. And all that gets overshadowed because a few drunken frat boys want to throw cups and bottles onto the floor. The thousands of phone calls and texts DeMarcus Cousins received from our fans gives us another black eye. One of the biggest games in recent MSU history, and idiotic fans want to make themselves bigger than the game they were not even playing.

Dee Bost led the Bulldog attack with 22 points, 5 rebounds and 3 assists in the overtime loss to Kentucky.

Now that I’m off my soap box, the Kentucky game was a big must-win for the Bulldogs, and they lost it. They needed this win to improve a lackluster tournament resume. MSU has an RPI of 62 and can’t afford anymore bad losses the rest of the way if they want the NCAA Selection Committee to even bat an eye at them. MSU received the worst compliment any team could receive. Scoop Jackson called MSU a team that plays up (or down) to its competition. It is definitely hard to argue that fact. After eight losses, only one of them is by double-digit points. That one loss was a season-opening game against Rider, a team MSU refused to take seriously. Every other game either won or lost by less than 10 points were either won or lost in the final two minutes. If MSU wants to make a serious run at getting back on the bubble, they have to win out and beat at least one of the big three of the east in the SEC tourney. With the loss, MSU drops into second place in the west. They can still win the west because Arkansas has a tougher finishing schedule. They have Vandy, at Tennessee and Ole Miss left, and MSU has to go to South Carolina and a season finale at home against Tennessee. MSU’s NCAA tourney lives are in their hands at this point. The Bulldogs had their gut-check moment last season after a home loss to Auburn. Then they won out in the regular season and rode the momentum to a SEC tourney crown. Will they use this loss as a wake-up call? They have to. The leading scorer Ravern Johnson did not play. Jarvis Varnado was ineffective due to foul trouble. Even with all that going against them, they still take the country’s second-ranked team to overtime. There are no more excuses for this team from this point on. I’m trying to stay hopeful for the Dawgs, but anymore losses could give them a number-one seed, in the NIT.


Funny Friday

This isn’t funny, but this was one of the best posterizing dunks I ever seen. Instead of having a NBA slam dunk contest this year, play this dunk on the jumbotron in place of every dunk and donate the prize money to Virginia’s scholarship fund.


Tim Tebow’s NFL Future

I never thought I would be joining the club, but I guess I have to. I’m now in the Tebow Crush Conglomerate. Not because I like him, I still think people still glorify him a bit too much, but because a lot of people are still skeptical of his chances of being a legitimate NFL quarterback.

Tim Tebow is not built to have the same kind of success in the NFL as he did in college. But that does not mean he can't be a good pro QB.

I know the title says “Tebow’s Draft Stock” but his draft stock is irrelevant right now. Tebow, as of right now, is a project QB. You have to take the time to groom him into a serviceable QB. Yes, he has mechanics issues and hasn’t taken that many snaps under center. Who else had the same thing said about them coming out of college? Vince Young. Young had (and still has) that ¾ delivery and took majority of his collegiate snaps from the shotgun at Texas. Yet, he still went third overall in the 2006 NFL Draft because of his intangibles. STOP!!! I’m not about to suggest that Tebow should go that high. All I’m saying is no QB is unfixable unless they’re named Ryan Leaf, Akili Smith, or Jamarcus Russell. Tebow is committed to becoming an NFL QB, and placed in the right situation; he can be a good, not great or legendary, but a good QB. Now, if Trent Dilfer and Brad Johnson can win Super Bowls and if Mark Sanchez can get a team to the AFC championship game as a rookie, Tebow can produce similar results. All three have something in common, great defenses. Quarterbacks get too much credit for winning and receive too much blame for losing. Dilfer, Johnson, and Sanchez were given keys to a Mabach and were asked not to wreck it. Those defenses were asked to lead the way, and all the QBs had to do was manage the game. As evidence, Dilfer’s and Johnson’s Super Bowl stats:

  • Dilfer: 12/25, 153 yds, 1TD, 0 INT
  • Johnson: 18/34, 215 yds, 2 TD, 1 INT

Their respective opposing QB’s had less than stellar games. Kerry Collins threw 4 interceptions against the Ravens and Rich Gannon was picked off 5 times against the Bucs. Sanchez was in position to win, but Peyton Manning figured out the Jets defense. There is no reason to believe Tebow can’t be surrounded with a good defense. His mechanics can be fixed. He has a traditional throw, but he drops the ball down to waist-level before release, something that won’t be rectified by draft day but can be worked on in OTAs and training camp. Learning how to take snaps under center can be fixed with time and more reps. This is Tebow’s ideal situation: draft him in the third round and build a defense around him. If he has to throw the ball 35 times a game, he won’t pan out. Build a D around him and give him a productive running game. On occasion you can ask him to become a gunslinger, but you can’t expect that from him week in and week out.


My Case For a College Football Playoff

Before I delve any further into this, I will pose a question that I’m going to give two answers for, the politically correct answer and the flat-out truth.

Why isn’t there a playoff system in place for the FBS (Division I-A)?

The politically correct answer: We don’t want the college football season to interrupt finals and take away the Christmas break from our student-athletes.

The truth: We stand to lose too much money if we attempted a football playoff and the in-season games won’t mean as much

Now, the hot topic in college football nowadays is whether a playoff system should be implemented. Me personally, I’m all for a four-team playoff season. The FCS (Division I-AA) goes with a 16-team format, but that’s too much when all you’re trying to do is put the two best teams in a position to play each other. The excuse that a playoff system might cut into academics is complete garbage. The FCS starts their playoffs right after Thanksgiving and runs until right before Christmas, final exam time for most, if not all, college campuses. You don’t hear the student-athletes complaining, and there hasn’t been any type of intervention trying to stop the FCS from having a playoff system. The student-athletes’ grades must not be that bad (or not that much of an issue) if they continue to play during exam time.

I’ve squashed the politically correct answer. Now let’s get to the heart of the matter. It’s all about the money in the land of college football. The (assumed) fact that it lessens the importance of some in-season games doesn’t matter. We’re not giving USC a pass because they lose to Stanford in-season and still have a high enough BCS ranking to earn a spot in the playoffs. That doesn’t matter because all I want is four teams. The top four teams in the BCS get in, regardless. There are no conference tie-ins to the playoffs. I don’t care if it’s one SEC team, one PAC-10 team, one Big Ten team and one Big XII team; or if it’s two SEC teams, an ACC team and a non-BCS team. It’s simple, win and get in.

What about the teams that get snubbed? Don’t be 42-point favorites at home and lose to Stanford. Win your conference, go undefeated and don’t leave YOUR destiny in the hands of a computer. When you have to pray to a bunch of journalists to give you a high enough ranking to justify you going to a particular bowl game, you’ve already lost that end of the battle.

What about the bowl games? Simple enough, nothing. Leave the current bowl lineup the way it is. Add two more New Year’s Day bowl games, but they’re not bowl games, they’re BCS national semifinal games. You already have the BCS National Championship game when the national title used to rotate between the four BCS bowls (that’s how Miami, then a Big East school and Nebraska, a Big XII school, played in the Rose Bowl, traditionally a Big Ten-PAC-10 bowl game, in 2002). Play both semi-final games at a neutral site, and for a true neutral-site game, split tickets 50/50. If you’re top-4 in the BCS, I’m pretty sure your fan base will want to travel to see you play for a national title. Since everyone is trying to make money, have stadiums bid to host the semifinal games. Make the winning bid known two years in advance.

Let’s look at last season, the top four teams in the BCS were

  1. Oklahoma (12-1)
  2. Florida (12-1)
  3. Texas (11-1)
  4. Alabama (12-1)

Oklahoma would have played Alabama, and Florida and Texas would play in the other semifinal. Getting to watch these two games THEN seeing the winners play each other in the BCS national championship game the very next week is much more intriguing than seeing Oklahoma/Florida, Texas/Ohio State, and Alabama/Utah.

That’s my proposal for a four-team college football playoff. This is as flawless as it’s going to get and it’s not flawless. But it’s better than five or six teams griping about trying to get two spots (one really since, the SEC champion will get one spot majority of the time).